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WILDLIFE & NATURE
Click here for conservation board sponsored events!
 

HEERY WOODS NATURE CENTER
27887 195TH STREET,
CLARKSVILLE

Built in 1988, Heery Woods Nature Center serves as the center for environmental and outdoor recreation programming offered by the Butler County Conservation Board. Designed around the theme “This is your Heritage” center visitors can learn about natural, cultural, and local history through visual and hands-on exhibits. Exhibits on prairies, wetlands, and forests help visitors learn about the natural world around them. You can also learn about cultural and local history through exhibits on Native American Artifacts, River History, and Park History. Outside, park visitors can learn more about the park and the natural world on one of two self-guided interpretive trails and through interpretive signs placed around the park. Programs for schools, youth, and special interest groups are offered by appointment, and general public programs are offered on a regular basis. Public programs are advertised through the local paper. Two programs, the October Halloween Hike, and the January Lighted Night Ski, are annual events. Information about Nature Center hours and programs is available by calling (319) 278-1130
 


Heery Woods Nature Center

BOYLAN CREEK WILDLIFE
MANAGEMENT AREA

15404 HIGHWAY 3, DUMONT
Purchased using Habitat Stamp Money and with help from the local Pheasants Forever and Ducks Unlimited Chapters, this 334 acre area is located just south of Bristow on Highway 3. This area features excellent hunting for upland game birds, wild turkey and white tailed deer. For the trapper, the creek, timber edges, and fence lines provide excellent runways for many furbearers. The Boylan Creek Wildlife Management Area has been enhanced with food plots, tree and shrub plantings, and nesting areas for wildlife. These enhancements provide for the needs of wildlife throughout the year.

LAKE CONSIDINE
15509 230TH STREET, DUMONT
The major use of this area is fishing and hunting. The majority of the area provides excellent hunting opportunities for deer, turkey, squirrel and duck. The West Fork River and small pond provide fishing opportunities for many different fish species. Since most of the pond is privately owned, we ask that you respect private property in this area. Hunting is prohibited in and around the camping area.

HELT MEMORIAL PRESERVE
32817 SPRING AVENUE, NEW HARTFORD
This 25-acre area was donated to the Conservation Board by the estate of the late Donald Helt. Placed in the CRP program in the 1980’s the area was primarily brome and timothy with a few cedar trees planted along one area. Since it’s acquisition it has been enhanced with prairie grasses, a food plot, and tree plantings. These improvements have greatly increased the types and numbers of wildlife species using the area.

MOORE’S ACCESS
29988 TRAPPER ROAD, NEW HARTFORD
Designed in 1997 as a walk in area only, Moore’s Access provides access to Beaver Creek. A small open area located along the creek and walk in access make the area a good choice for a beginning backpacking trip. The stream allows good early-season waterfowl hunting as well as fishing for Smallmouth bass and Catfish.

WEST FORK FOREST ACCESS
28376 TEMPLE AVENUE BETWEEN
SHELL ROCK AND NEW HARTFORD

Located along County Road T-55, this 108 acre area of bottomland timber provides excellent habitat for many species of wildlife. Dotted with pot holes, the area offers good early-season waterfowl hunting. An abundance of swamp white oaks and tree plantings of pines and cedars provide food and cover for many squirrels, deer, and wild turkey. Primitive camping is allowed in the park, but water and restroom facilities are not available.

HAUSER’S WILDLIFE AREA

11611 VAIL AVENUE NE CORNER OF THE COUNTY
Diversity is one word that describes this 25 acre refuge. Located along a small tributary of the Shell Rock River called Beaver Creek this wildlife refuge provides a combination of aquatic, forest, and upland habitats that support a wide variety of species.

KYLE
WILDLIFE AREA
13286 130TH STREET, AREDALE
Donated by Joe Kyle as a wildlife refuge, this 19 acre area provides excellent winter habitat for a wide array of wildlife including pheasants, deer, and songbirds. In 1999 work was done on the waterway passing through the area to provide better drainage for the surrounding farms. The re-development of this waterway should promote a greater abundance of aquatic oriented furbearers in the area.

SKILLEN’S CORNER HABITAT DEMONSTRATION AREA
C13 AND T24 INTERSECTION, GREENE
Located at the intersections of C13 and T24 is the Skillen’s Corner Demonstration Area. Designed as a teaching area, the Butler County Conservation Board Staff has planted trees, shrubs, and prairie grasses to demonstrate how good planning and proper maintenance can help enhance wildlife habitat.

WOLTER’S PRAIRIE PRESERVE
19155 QUAIL AVENUE, CLARKSVILLE
In 1984, captured by the beautiful wildflowers found there, the Butler County Conservation Board purchased the first half of this 40 acre native prairie area from John Wolters. In 1990 the local chapter of Pheasants Forever purchased the remaining 20 acres on behalf of the Conservation Board. The result is a well preserved island of native grasses and forbs that represent Iowa’s past. Today this native prairie is used to teach about the natural and cultural history of Iowa.

LEEPER’S PRAIRIE PRESERVE
21657 RIDGE AVENUE, CLARKSVILLE
Donated to the county by Doris Leeper in memory of her late husband, this 41-acre prairie area is a remnant of what once covered most of Iowa. Management of the area is limited to tree removal and periodic spring burning. These practices will help to insure that the many prairie plants found there will continue to thrive and endure.
 


Heery Dam

FABER RESERVE
24260 FOREST AVENUE, KESLEY
Donated by former board member Herman Faber, this 27.5 acre area of upland habitat is located north of Aplington near the newer additions to the Big Marsh. Replanted with native grasses, trees, and a food plot, Faber Reserve provides nesting, loafing and winter cover for a variety of game and non-game species. In 2003, a wetland was added to the area increasing it’s attractiveness to wildlife.

SHELL ROCK WILDLIFE AREA
22562 MAIN STREET, SHELL ROCK
Adjacent to the Shell Rock Recreation area is the Shell Rock Wildlife Area. This 49 acre area of floodplain forest provides valuable wetlands that are home to waterfowl, beaver, deer, and a variety of non-game wildlife.
 

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